Music Theory

Harmonising Scales

You can harmonise a full scale just by using its notes to find the root, third and fifth of each degree. This involves a process of 'pick one, skip one, pick one, skip one, pick one'. For example, this is the process of harmonsing the major scale:

Major Scales Degrees: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

C Major Scale: C D E F G A B

First Chord: Starts on first degree (i.e C).

C's 3rd and 5th (skip 2 and 4): E G

C E G = Major Triad

This means the first chord of a major scale is a major chord, in our example that's Cmaj.

Second Chord: Starts on second degree (i.e D).

D's 3rd and 5th in this scale (skipping 3 and 5): F A

D F A = Minor Triad

This means the second chord of a major scale is a minor chord. in our example, that's Dm.

If you did this for the rest of the major scale you would get:

1 = Major (1 3 5)

2 = Minor (2 4 6)

3 = Minor (3 5 7)

4 = Major (4 6 1)

5= Major (5 7 2)

6= Minor (6 1 3)

7 = Diminished (7 2 4)

So the chords of the C major scale are: C Dm Em F G Am Bdim 

MINOR SCALE

If you were to follow the same process for the C minor scale, this would be the result:

Minor Scale Degrees: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7

C Minor Scale: C D Eb F G G# Bb

Minor Scale Chords: 

1 = Minor (1 b3 5)

2 = Diminished (2 4 b6)

b3 = Major (b3 5 b7)

4 = Minor (4 b6 1)

5 = Minor (5 b7 2)

b6 = Major (b6 1 b3)

b7 = Major (b7 2 4)

So the chords of the C minor scale are: Cm Ddmin Eb Fm Gm G# Bb